Home

Exercise

Chronic inflammation has been linked to multiple health issues that plague our society, including obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some cancers plus a range of autoimmune diseases. Here we’ll highlight what chronic inflammation is and some simple lifestyle changes to help reduce the toll it takes on your body.

Acute inflammation is the body’s response to tissue injury. It is the first line of defense against injury and is characterized by changes in microcirculation, leakage of fluid and migration of white blood cells from blood vessels to the area of injury. Typically of short duration, acute inflammation is primarily aimed at removing the injurious agent. Most of the time it is self-limiting. Clinically, acute inflammation is characterized by five cardinal signs: rubor (redness), calor (heat), tumor (swelling), dolor (pain), and functio laesa (loss of function). The acute inflammatory process is essential for tissue healing and repair.

Chronic inflammation, on the other hand, serves no function and has been linked to many of the chronic illnesses that are epidemic today, such as: diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, autoimmune diseases, arthritis, some cancers, allergies, asthma and obesity. (Khansari, N et al. 2009)

SPEED is an acronym for five major lifestyle factors that can be manipulated to mitigate and/or reverse some of the effects of chronic inflammation:

  1. Sleep
  2. Psychological stress
  3. Environment
  4. Exercise
  5. Diet

Sleep

Increase your heart smarts with info on how exercise impacts your heart, how to measure fitness via heart rate, and top cardio concerns fitness pros should know.

How it Works

Your heart weighs only about 10 ounces and is roughly the size of an adult fist. This four chamber, centrally located pump pushes five to six quarts of blood, per minute, throughout your body.

• Each heartbeat is initiated by a specialized area called the sinoatrial node (SA node) in the heart’s upper right chamber. The SA node is often called the pacemaker (or primary pacemaker) of the heart, triggering electrical impulses that squeeze this part of the heart slightly earlier than the rest of the heart, forcing blood into the lower chambers for each beat.

• When you exercise, your muscles require more oxygen and nutrients, at a quicker rate, to fuel contractions. Your heart will beat faster to deliver more blood to meet this demand. In addition, the arterioles (smaller blood vessels leading from the arteries to the capillaries) serving the exercising muscles dilate to accommodate the increased flow. As these vessels open, other arterioles constrict in less active parts of your body, including your digestive system, skin, and the skeletal muscles you’re not using.

• Exercise makes your heart stronger. A stronger heart pumps blood more easily throughout this entire process, keeping blood pressure healthy or reducing blood pressure that’s too high. It can also improve circulation, lower heart disease risk, improve blood cholesterol levels, and lower resting heart rate.

Training with Heart

Heart rate is a good exercise-intensity gauge. Here are two ways to track heart rate to help improve and monitor fitness.

User login

-A A +A
Once you've created an account,
For permissions to translate and distribute your publications, blogs and articles

Send Request/Questions using
CONTACT Form

Testimonial

Exactly as Described and Pictured. Right On Time W/Delivery. Great Transaction.

eBay - Member id agskog
feedback